South and North of the Border: Houston Paints Houston
Aug
16
to Jan 12

South and North of the Border: Houston Paints Houston

Guest Curators: Tam Kiehnhoff and Randy Tibbits

Admission: $5 for adults, $2 children 5–18

In October 1894, James Perkins Richardson wrote from Galveston to his sister, Emma Richardson Cherry, then living in Denver, to discourage her from relocating to a “mud-hole called Houston.”  At the time, Houston was a town of barely 30,000 people; Richardson was a recent Yale graduate who would one day found the prestigious Prosso Preparatory School in the city; and Cherry was a professional artist who would almost singlehandedly lay the foundation of the vibrant art center that Houston would become. Barely 70 years later, by the 1960s, the population of the city had grown 30 fold, and Houston was known worldwide as “Space City.”   Mud-hole to Space City in a single lifetime: What a trajectory.  And what a revolution in visioning the city such a transformation required.

Showing that re-visioning through the eyes and works of Houston’s own artists is the goal of the exhibition Houston Paints Houston.  It is our hope that by bringing together, from public and private collections, more than 60 works created over more than 130 years, we can help present-day Houstonians better understand how the vision of the city evolved, and helped create the modern city in which we live.

This exhibition is half of a joint project with the umbrella title South and North of the Border, to be mounted in conjunction with the Ideson Gallery of Houston Public Library, where Houston Paints Mexico will explore how our artists helped create our understanding of our closest, and in many ways, most important neighbor.  The two shows together are corner stones of the Festival of Earlier Houston Art taking place in institutions and galleries all over Houston during the fall of 2018.

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Noon Lecture
Oct
18
12:00 PM12:00

Noon Lecture

Lost Restaurants of Houston
by Paul Galvani

The Heritage Society Tea Room
Free for members, $5 for non-members

With more than fourteen thousand eating establishments covering seventy different ethnic cuisines, Houston is a foodie town. But even in a place where eating out is a way of life and restaurants come and go, there were some iconic spots that earned a special place in the hearts and stomachs of locals. Maxim’s taught overnight millionaires how to handle meals that came with three forks. The Trader Vic’s at the Shamrock offered dedicated homebodies a chance for the exotic, and Sonny Look’s Sirloin Inn maintained the reputation of a city of steakhouses. From Alfred’s Delicatessen to Youngblood’s Fried Chicken, Paul and Christiane Galvani celebrate the stories and recipes of Houston’s fondly remembered tastemakers. Hear stories about the lost restaurants of Houston.

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Specialty Tour of Old Place
Oct
19
11:00 AM11:00

Specialty Tour of Old Place

First and Third Friday: 11:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m.
Cost: $10

Every Friday a costumed docent will give you a tour about life in Austin's Colony. The tour focuses on the hardships of daily life in the early 1820s. A costumed interpreter explains and demonstrates important facets of textile production on the frontier - spinning, dyeing, and weaving in addition to the regular domestic activities of that era.  Other areas being addressed include building construction methods and tools, the empressario system of colonization in Texas, and land grants. 

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Specialty Tour of Old Place
Oct
19
1:00 PM13:00

Specialty Tour of Old Place

First and Third Friday: 11:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m.
Cost: $10

Every Friday a costumed docent will give you a tour about life in Austin's Colony. The tour focuses on the hardships of daily life in the early 1820s. A costumed interpreter explains and demonstrates important facets of textile production on the frontier - spinning, dyeing, and weaving in addition to the regular domestic activities of that era.  Other areas being addressed include building construction methods and tools, the empressario system of colonization in Texas, and land grants. 

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NoTsuOh Pet Parade
Oct
28
3:00 PM15:00

NoTsuOh Pet Parade

Connally Plaza
1100 Bagby Street
Houston, TX 77002

The Heritage Society is reviving No-Tsu-Oh, Houston’s biggest historic celebration, and our first public event is a costumed pet parade and dog fest. The original No-Tsu-Oh ran from 1899 to 1915 and was filled with over a week of parades and celebrations. As we build toward a citywide renewal of this iconic Houston event with a focus on history, culture and the arts, we figured what better place to start than with our beloved pets.

One of the afternoon’s highlights will be a costumed pet parade. Pet owners are encouraged to dress up, as well, and even decorated strollers are allowed. The number of entries is limited and only friendly, socialized, well-behaved pets will be allowed. Prizes will be awarded based on overall impression and creativity.

Other pet-related entertainment will be offered along with food, beverages and a variety of vendors. Pet adoption services will also be present. More features will be added, so please check back for updates.

It takes place on Sunday, October 28 from 3 to 5 PM in our Connally Plaza, 1100 Bagby between Lamar and Dallas.

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Nov
15
12:00 PM12:00

Noon Lecture

Early Texas Judges: Crazy Deals and Crazy Cases
by Justice Ken Wise

The Heritage Society Tea Room
Free for members, $5 for non-members

The November lecturer is Appeals Court Justice and Texas history podcaster, Ken Wise.  Among the characters to be explored are Thomas Jefferson Chambers and his questionable land speculations, as well as his stealing Supreme Court records to keep from losing a case.  Judge B.C. Franklin was the messenger to Interim President David G. Burnet from San Jacinto after the battle and was also the first judge to hold court in Houston for the newly formed Republic of Texas. But he also presided over a semi-secret court to dispose of a captured American ship at the end of the Texas Revolution. Justice Wise will speak a bit about our courthouse square and other early cases in Houston.

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Dec
8
5:00 PM17:00

Candlelight Tour

Tickets: $10 in advance, $15 at the door, children 5 and under are free

After a one-year hiatus due to Hurricane Harvey, this Houston holiday tradition returns for one night only. Escape the busy holiday preparations and instead stroll through our cozy historic homes and celebrate the season. From pioneer demonstrations in our 1823 Old Place, to a fancy feast fit for the wealthiest man in town, to a humble traditional German Christmas, you will see it all!  Then, take a seat in the 1891 St. John Church and listen as The Houston Boychoir performs classic holiday songs. Food trucks will be on hand to supply a variety of food and refreshments.

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Specialty Tour of Old Place
Oct
5
1:00 PM13:00

Specialty Tour of Old Place

First and Third Friday: 11:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m.
Cost: $10

Every Friday a costumed docent will give you a tour about life in Austin's Colony. The tour focuses on the hardships of daily life in the early 1820s. A costumed interpreter explains and demonstrates important facets of textile production on the frontier - spinning, dyeing, and weaving in addition to the regular domestic activities of that era.  Other areas being addressed include building construction methods and tools, the empressario system of colonization in Texas, and land grants. 

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Specialty Tour of Old Place
Oct
5
11:00 AM11:00

Specialty Tour of Old Place

First and Third Friday
Cost: $10

Every Friday a costumed docent will give you a tour about life in Austin's Colony. The tour focuses on the hardships of daily life in the early 1820s. A costumed interpreter explains and demonstrates important facets of textile production on the frontier - spinning, dyeing, and weaving in addition to the regular domestic activities of that era.  Other areas being addressed include building construction methods and tools, the empressario system of colonization in Texas, and land grants. 

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Lecture with Stephen Fox
Sep
27
7:00 PM19:00

Lecture with Stephen Fox

Reflections on Houston
by Stephen Fox

The Heritage Society Tea Room
Free admission

Great artists have used their works to fix the images of great cities: Canaletto on Venice, for example. What do the paintings in Houston Paints Houston say about the relationship between Houston and its artists? Stephen Fox will explore this question in his talk about the exhibition and the city that inspired it. The Museum Gallery will be open from 6:00–7:00 p.m. This lecture is sponsored by Center for the Advancement of Study of Early Texas Art ( CASETA).

Please rsvp to gberni@heritagesociety.org.

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Specialty Tour of Old Place
Sep
21
1:00 PM13:00

Specialty Tour of Old Place

First and Third Friday: 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.
Cost: $10

A costumed docent will give you a tour about life in Austin's Colony. The tour focuses on the hardships of daily life in the early 1820s. A costumed interpreter explains and demonstrates important facets of textile production on the frontier - spinning, dyeing, and weaving in addition to the regular domestic activities of that era.  Other areas being addressed include building construction methods and tools, the empressario system of colonization in Texas, and land grants. 

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Specialty Tour Old Place
Sep
21
11:00 AM11:00

Specialty Tour Old Place

First and Third Friday: 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.
Cost: $10

A costumed docent will give you a tour about life in Austin's Colony. The tour focuses on the hardships of daily life in the early 1820s. A costumed interpreter explains and demonstrates important facets of textile production on the frontier - spinning, dyeing, and weaving in addition to the regular domestic activities of that era.  Other areas being addressed include building construction methods and tools, the empressario system of colonization in Texas, and land grants. 

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Noon Lecture
Sep
20
12:00 PM12:00

Noon Lecture

Houston Hispanics and the Vietnam War
by Jesse Esparza

The Heritage Society Tea Room
Free for members, $5 for non-members

The Vietnam War is considered one of the most controversial and polarizing wars in U.S. history. A product of the Cold War, this conflict would see some 540,000 troops deployed and more than 58,000 American soldiers dead. Among those deployed were 170,000 Mexican Americans. The Latino trooper was typically in his early 20's, single, working-class, and highly under-educated. Mexican Americans across the nation, in fact, lived in neighborhoods with aging infrastructure, declining property values, and rising poverty levels. Despite that, Mexican Americans answered the call to duty receiving high honors for their valor in battle. Join us for the Noon Lecture and learn about the untold stories of Mexican Americans involvement in the Vietnam War.

 

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NoTsuOh Coronation Gala Kickoff Party
Sep
12
6:00 PM18:00

NoTsuOh Coronation Gala Kickoff Party

Welcome Wilson, Sr., King Nottoc
Catherine C. Brock, Queen Ailongom

Minnette and Peter Boesel & Jo and Jim Furr
Gala Co-chairs

Deborah Colton Gallery
2445 North Boulevard, 77098
Free admision

Join us to celebrate the revival of NoTsuOh which took place in early days of Houston form 1899 – 1915. Chaired by Minnette & Peter Boesel and Jo & Jim Furr, the event honors Welcome Wilson, Sr. as King Nottoc and Catherine C. Brock as Queen Ailongam.

The event will be held on September 12th at the Deborah Colton Gallery at 2445 North Boulevard, 77098 from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

For more information about the  NoTsuOh Coronation Gala

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Specialty Tour of Old Place
Sep
7
1:00 PM13:00

Specialty Tour of Old Place

First and Third Friday: 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.
Cost: $10

A costumed docent will give you a tour about life in Austin's Colony. The tour focuses on the hardships of daily life in the early 1820s. A costumed interpreter explains and demonstrates important facets of textile production on the frontier - spinning, dyeing, and weaving in addition to the regular domestic activities of that era.  Other areas being addressed include building construction methods and tools, the empressario system of colonization in Texas, and land grants. 

View Event →
Specialty Tour of Old Place
Sep
7
11:00 AM11:00

Specialty Tour of Old Place

First and Third Friday: 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.
Cost: $10

A costumed docent will give you a tour about life in Austin's Colony. The tour focuses on the hardships of daily life in the early 1820s. A costumed interpreter explains and demonstrates important facets of textile production on the frontier - spinning, dyeing, and weaving in addition to the regular domestic activities of that era.  Other areas being addressed include building construction methods and tools, the empressario system of colonization in Texas, and land grants. 

View Event →
Specialty Tour of Old Place
Aug
17
1:00 PM13:00

Specialty Tour of Old Place

First and Third Friday: 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.
Cost: $10

A costumed docent will give you a tour about life in Austin's Colony. The tour focuses on the hardships of daily life in the early 1820s. A costumed interpreter explains and demonstrates important facets of textile production on the frontier - spinning, dyeing, and weaving in addition to the regular domestic activities of that era.  Other areas being addressed include building construction methods and tools, the empressario system of colonization in Texas, and land grants. 

View Event →
Specialty Tour of Old Place
Aug
17
11:00 AM11:00

Specialty Tour of Old Place

First and Third Friday: 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.
Cost: $10

A costumed docent will give you a tour about life in Austin's Colony. The tour focuses on the hardships of daily life in the early 1820s. A costumed interpreter explains and demonstrates important facets of textile production on the frontier - spinning, dyeing, and weaving in addition to the regular domestic activities of that era.  Other areas being addressed include building construction methods and tools, the empressario system of colonization in Texas, and land grants. 

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Noon Lecture Series
Aug
16
12:00 PM12:00

Noon Lecture Series

The Chicken Ranch
by Jayme Blaschke

The Heritage Society Tea Room
Free for members, $5 for non-members

Thanks to the classic Dolly Parton film The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas and ZZ Top's ode "La Grange," many people think they know the story of the infamous Chicken Ranch. The reality is more complex, lying somewhere between heartbreaking and absurd. For more than a century, dirt farmers and big-cigar politicians alike rubbed shoulders at the Chicken Ranch, operated openly under the sheriff's watchful eye. Madam Edna Milton and her girls ran a tight, discreet ship that the God-fearing people of La Grange tolerated if not outright embraced. That is, until a secret conspiracy enlisted an opportunistic reporter to bring it all crashing down on primetime television. Through exclusive interviews with Milton, former government officials and reporters, Jayme Lynn Blaschke delivers a fascinating, revelatory view of the Ranch that illuminates the truth and lies that surround this iconic brothel.

 

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Specialty Tour of Old Place
Aug
3
1:00 PM13:00

Specialty Tour of Old Place

First and Third Friday: 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.
Cost: $10

A costumed docent will give you a tour about life in Austin's Colony. The tour focuses on the hardships of daily life in the early 1820s. A costumed interpreter explains and demonstrates important facets of textile production on the frontier - spinning, dyeing, and weaving in addition to the regular domestic activities of that era.  Other areas being addressed include building construction methods and tools, the empressario system of colonization in Texas, and land grants. 

 

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Noon Lecture
Jul
19
12:00 PM12:00

Noon Lecture

Texas, the Anaconda, and the Milam Street Blockade Runner
by Andy Hall

The Heritage Society Tea Room
Free for members, $5 for non-members

During the American Civil War, Texas played an increasingly important role in the smuggling of materials in and out of the Confederacy. Hall will discuss the important role Houstonians played in that, and made fortunes that served as a foundation of legacies remain woven into the community's fabric today. But did a blockade runner REALLY make it all the way up past Allen's Landing?

 

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Noon Lecture Series
Jun
21
12:00 PM12:00

Noon Lecture Series

Re-examining Confederate Monuments in Texas
by Ron Goodwin

The Heritage Society Tea Room
Free for members, $5 for non-members

A discussion of Confederate monuments as symbols that continue to divide our country. Dr. Ron Goodwin of Prairie View A&M University explores the Lost Cause mythology behind these statues and the groups who erected them. While these monuments may honor individuals who possessed characteristics of honor and loyalty in the eyes of some, they continue to be a constant reminder of the efforts to protect slavery and the damage done to political and social institutions in the views of others.

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Noon Lecture Series
May
17
12:00 PM12:00

Noon Lecture Series

Convict Cowboys: Texas Prison Rodeo
by Mitchel Roth

The Heritage Society Tea Room
Free for members, $5 for non-members

Convict Cowboys is the tale of the nation’s first prison rodeo, which ran from 1931 to 1986. At its apogee the Texas Prison Rodeo drew 30,000 spectators on October Sundays. Mitchel P. Roth portrays the Texas Prison Rodeo against a backdrop of Texas history, covering the history of rodeo, the prison system, and convict leasing, as well as important figures in Texas penology including Marshall Lee Simmons, O.B. Ellis, and George J. Beto, and the changing prison demimonde.

Over the years, the rodeo arena not only boasted death-defying entertainment that would make professional cowboys think twice, but featured a virtual who’s who of American popular culture, including Western film stars ranging from Tom Mix to John Wayne, and music legends such as Johnny Cash and Willie Nelson. Through extensive archival research, Roth introduces the convict cowboys in both the rodeo arena and behind prison walls, giving voice to a legion of previously forgotten inmate cowboys who risked life and limb for a few dollars and the applause of free-world crowds.

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May
17
to Aug 4

Dumped and Forgotten Below the Milam Street Bridge

Admission: $5 for adults, $2 children 5–18

In the summer of 1968, a local archeologist organized an excavation of Buffalo Bayou near the Milam Street Bridge in the hopes of recovering long forgotten Civil War artifacts. After the war ended in 1865, munitions, once housed at the Kennedy building located at Travis and Congress, were dumped into the bayou. The disposal of the weaponry was part of a broader effort to deprive the approaching Union forces of the equipment and supplies of the Confederacy.  Barges loaded with rifles and cannon balls were driven up stream to the low water bridge at Milam Street and sunk.

This amazing, never-before exhibited archeology collection has received new life with modern conservation treatments and has been researched by experts in munitions. The result of this year-long project is to educate visitors about Houston’s role as a port city in the Civil War, to discover what happened to these artifacts once abandoned in the bayou, and to learn about the techniques used to conserve artifacts left underwater for decades.

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Noon Lecture Series
Apr
19
12:00 PM12:00

Noon Lecture Series

The Houston Airport Turns 90
by Michael Bludworth

The Heritage Society Tea Room
Free for members, $5 for non-members

Incensed by being passed over for an Air Mail route, by Dallas of all places, the Houston business community worked together to produce a facility that could accommodate the mail. They succeeded on the anniversary of Texas Independence Day in 1928 when Houston saw the arrival of the Air Mail Service and the formal opening of Houston Airport. It was four years after the intrepid pilots began regular cross-country through service. Bludworth’s lecture is filled with amazing photos of airport construction and the fantastic flying machines that plied Bayou City skies. The city officially took it over in 1937, and it is still in operation 90 years later.

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See Interesting Places (SIP) Series
Apr
5
6:30 PM18:30

See Interesting Places (SIP) Series

$45 for members/$50 for non-member

Visit two homes in Old Sixth Ward followed by drinks and discussion at Julep.

The Steamboat House where neighborhood lore has it that the legendary aviatress, Amelia Earhart, regularly visited her uncle who lived in the house.

AND This ell-wing Folk Victorian cottage which was built in 1893. The floors in the front room are antique mahogany, salvaged from a historic River Oaks mansion plus a collection of art glass lighting, door hardware, pulls and hinges which are all antique.

To purchase tickets

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Noon Lecture Series
Mar
15
12:00 PM12:00

Noon Lecture Series

Photos and Stories from the Chronicle & Post Archives
by JR Gonzales from Bayou City History at the Houston Chronicle

The Heritage Society Tea Room
Free for members, $5 for non-members

JR Gonzales, master of the Bayou City History domain at the Houston Chronicle, will share rarely seen photos from the image archives at the Chronicle and the old Houston Post. They will include stories large and small about a random and wide variety of people and places from our city’s past. Every day for almost a century, these newspapers sent photographers out to capture images of Houston. Getting a glimpse inside this material is a rare treat for both the hard core and casual devotee of the city’s past.

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Mar
7
to Apr 28

A View from the Trenches: The Oberwetter World War I Collection

The exhibit will consist of up to 100 photographs and letters telling the story of Austin Oberwetter’s service in WWI.  His family has a long history in Texas and he thoroughly documented his service as an engineer in the military where he stated that he was tasked with building things “only to be destroyed by the war.” The collection also includes his letters home.

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