Exhibition
the Great Migration


 

The Great migration

The Great migration

July 5–August 19, 2017
10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m., Tues.–Sat.
The Heritage Society Museum Gallery
Free admission

The exhibition will feature original projects by students that help to illustrate the story of The Great Migration (1917-1970) of more than six million African Americans out of the South to other regions of the United States. The migration is one of the most important, courageous, and consequential movements in our nation’s history. In search of true freedom, equality, and opportunity, those brave migrants – fleeing systemic racism, abuse, oppression, enforced poverty, and terror – transformed American culture, society, demographics, and politics in a multitude of ways, both tangible and intangible.  African Americans, Mexican Americans, and Asian Americans also migrated to Houston from other regions, making our city the most diverse in the nation. 

This exhibit is Guest Curated by University of Houston Honors College Students with Professors Debbie Harwell & Irene Guenther. The Heritage Society is funded in part by a grant from the City of Houston through Houston Arts Alliance.
Image: The Connection of Blues

 

Current Exhibit

Finger Lecture Series
Fourth Ward Cottage: A building too significant not to have been saved
by Randy Pace

Randy Pace

Randy Pace

Thursday, July 20, 2017
12:00–1:00 p.m.
The Heritage Society Tea Room
Free for members, $5 for non-members

Randy Pace, author, historian and genealogist will make a presentation about the history and occupants of the Fourth Ward Cottage. The story of the cottage coming to The Heritage Society in Sam Houston Park began way back in the 1970s, and Pace considers researching its history and spearheading the coaltion which ultimately led to its preservation as his most important, personal achievement. Small buildings, such as the Fourth Ward Cottage, have just as much significance and importance associated with their architecture and occupants as larger, more imposing ones. And while the captains of industry and commerce, who built the grand, impressive edifaces of Houston achieved much, their successes were so dependent upon the contribution and sacrifices of thousands of working-class men and women. These unsung heroes built and occupied modest, but important dwellings, such as the Fourth Ward Cottage.

For more information

Specialty Tours at
Old Place


 

1823 Old Place

1823 Old Place

Fridays
11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.
Meet in the Museum Gallery
$10

Every Friday a costumed docent will give you a tour about life in Austin's Colony. The tour focuses on the hardships of daily life in the early 1820s. A costumed interpreter explains and demonstrates important facets of textile production on the frontier - spinning, dyeing, and weaving in addition to the regular domestic activities of that era.  Other areas being addressed include building construction methods and tools, the empressario system of colonization in Texas, and land grants. 

For more information about tours